Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #18

Recently on BMJ it has been published a free meta-analysis and systematic review about job-related stressors and suicidality (Milner et al, 2018), a very interesting topic. Job stressors are widely acknowledged as determinants of common mental health disorders, and in literature there are several works about their correlation with suicidality. The paper by Milner and coworkers offers an overview of what is known in the literature about this topic.

LINKPsychosocial job stressors and suicidality: a meta-analysis and systematic review

Regarding job stressors and suicidality, it is known that physicians have an increased risk to die by suicide; it is quite difficult to estimate with accuracy the phenomenon, but it seems that approximately 300-400 physicians die every year for suicide, a doctor a day. Medical profession is one of the occupations with the highest risk of death by suicide.

The Washington Post recently published the article “What I’ve learned from my tally of 757 doctor suicides”, written by a family physician who, in addition to her daily work, is committed in suicide prevention. She reports about  an “uncomfortable” topic for discussion, the problem of suicide among physicians, trying to summarize the main findings collected during many years of practice.

LINKWhat I’ve learned from my tally of 757 doctor suicides

Among physycians, psychiatrist have to face with people who attempt suicide nearly every day. On Jama Psychiatry has been recently published an interesting issue by N. P. Morris, a medical doctor working at the Department of Psychiatry in Stanford University; the text is a reflection on psychiatrists daily activities and feelings, in particular when they are called to face with patients who made suicide attempts or self-harm.

LINKWhen Mind Deforms Body


You can find it on Frontiers in Psychiatry: click HERE

Image From Pixabay


Looking forward to sharing with you
the next scientific news and reading suggestions!


To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #17 – part 2

On March our reading suggestion was about a recent article by our member Christina van der Feltz-Cornelis on “Frontiers in Psychiatry”:

“Springtime Peaks and Christmas Troughs: A National Longitudinal Population-Based Study into Suicide Incidence Time Trends in the Netherlands”
Emma Hofstra, Iman Elfeddali, Marjan Bakker, Jacobus J. de Jong, Chijs van Nieuwenhuizen and Christina M. van der Feltz-Cornelis

Here her comment about it:

“Time trends are one of the most studied phenomena in suicide research; however, evidence for time trends in the Dutch population remains understudied. Insight into time trends can contribute to the development of effective suicide prevention strategies.

Therefore, we examined time trends in national daily and monthly data of 33,224 suicide events that occurred in the Netherlands from 1995 to 2015, as well as the influence of age, gender, and province, in a longitudinal population-based design with Poisson regression analyses and Bayesian change point analyses.

We found that suicide incidence among Dutch residents increased from 2007 until 2015 by 38%. Suicide rates peak in spring, up to 8% higher than in summer (< 0.001). Suicide incidence was 42% lower at Christmas, compared to the December-average (IRR = 0.580, < 0.001). After Christmas, a substantial increase occurred on January 1, which remained high during the first weeks of the new year. We also found effects by gender, age and province of residence, however, no differential effects were found for gender, age and province of residence in both season and Christmas with regards to suicide incidence.

It is recommended to plan (mental) health care services to be available especially at high-risk moments, at spring time, and in the beginning of January. Further research is needed to explore the protective effect of Christmas in suicide incidence”.


You can find it on Frontiers in Psychiatry: click HERE

Image From Pixabay


Looking forward to sharing with you
the next scientific news and reading suggestions!


To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

 

Thanks to Christina M. van der Feltz-Cornelis

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #17

Our member Christina van der Feltz-Cornelis suggested us her recent article, published on February, 2018, online on “Frontiers in Psychiatry”:

“Springtime Peaks and Christmas Troughs: A National Longitudinal Population-Based Study into Suicide Incidence Time Trends in the Netherlands”
Emma Hofstra, Iman Elfeddali, Marjan Bakker, Jacobus J. de Jong, Chijs van Nieuwenhuizen and Christina M. van der Feltz-Cornelis

It talks about suicide time trends in the Dutch population: it can be useful in order to create new prevention strategies, looking at planning mental health care services especially at high-risk moments (eg at spring time or in the beginning of January).


You can find it on Frontiers in Psychiatry: click HERE

Image From Pixabay


Looking forward to sharing with you
the next scientific news and reading suggestions!


To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

 

Thanks to Christina M. van der Feltz-Cornelis

 

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #16 – Jama

Jama Psychiatry published the list of the
Top 5 Articles in 2017. 

The Most Read JAMA Psychiatry Article in 2017
is about suicide:

National Trends in Suicide Attempts Among Adults
in the United States 


Olfson M, Blanco C, Wall M, Liu S, Saha TD, Pickering RP, Grant BF. National Trends in Suicide Attempts Among Adults in the United States. JAMA Psychiatry. 2017;74(11):1095–1103. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.2582


Looking forward to sharing with you
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To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

Image from Pixabay

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #15

Two hints about suicidology and suicide prevention recently published on high impact medical research journals: BMJ and World Psychiatry. They both talk about suicide mortality after discharge from psychiatric hospitals. 

Here following the themes developed:

  • Suicide, substance use and natural causes are respectively the most important causes of mortality in the first year post discharge from psychiatric hospitals (Large M; on BMJ)
  • Decline in suicide mortality after psychiatric hospitalization for depression in Finland between 1991 and 2014 (Aaltonen KI; on World Psychiatry)

People suffering from psychiatric diseases have higher mortality rate, and this is particularly true for those who have been admitted in a psychiatric hospital and then discharged. It is known that suicide risk is higher in the first 3 months after discharge and remains high through the entire first year (see our previous reading suggestion from JAMA).


Sources:

To know more you can find the articles on  BMJ and World Psychiatry website at these links: 


Looking forward to sharing with you
the next scientific news and reading suggestions!


To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

Image from Pixabay 

 

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #14 – part 2

In our last “Scientific news and reading suggestion” presented an article shared by one of our members, Professor Stephen Palmer:

“Hearing the Suicidal Patient’s Emotional Pain –
A Typological Model to Improve Communication”
Dunkley, Borthwick, Bartlett, Dunkley,Palmer, Gleeson, Kingdon.

Here is a short summary by Stephen Palmer and Christine Dunkley:

“Suicide is known to be driven, in part, by a desire to escape emotional pain. We wondered how emotional pain communication was transmitted to mental health professionals, and how those professionals picked it up. Using a qualitative study design and thematic analysis we devised a model showing that patients communications can be either spoken or unspoken, and each type may be heard or unheard. We identified 14 factors that influence whether the patient will speak out or not, and whether the clinician will pick up the communication or not. One of the factors that our participants identified was that if patients can actually speak out about their emotional pain, it is often deemed less serious by their care team, than the kind of communication that is picked up non-verbally. Patients also identified instances of good practice, such as when professionals remained in contact with them, making it more likely that they would disclose their emotional pain. This research is important in identifying ways in which clinical practice can improve, some of which have no cost implications”.

You can find it on our report about members’ publications or at this link.

Thanks to Dr Christine Dunkley & Prof Stephen Palmer

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #14

Professor Stephen Palmer shared the following article, published online on December, 2017, on the Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention:

“Hearing the Suicidal Patient’s Emotional Pain –
A Typological Model to Improve Communication”
Dunkley, Borthwick, Bartlett, Dunkley, Palmer, Gleeson, Kingdon.

It is Open Access. You can find it on our report about members’ publications or at this link.

Image from Pixabay


Looking forward to sharing with you
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To know more, contact EPA- SSSP e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com


Thanks to Professor Stephen Palmer, PhD CBiol CPsychol CSci

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #13

Some of our Section Members have created several educational Flyers on suicide prevention in high risk population, including recommendations and orientations about suicide related topics; one of them concerns LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transexual and Q, questioning) population. The Flyers Project is still ongoing and we hope this could help the average clinician with practical highlights.  

A recent letter published on JAMA, “Suicide Risk Behaviors Among Sexual Minority Adolescents in the United States, 2015” by Theodore L. Caputi and coworkers reports about suicide risk in sexual minority adolescents using nationally representative data from 2015.

On 19th December Jen Christensen of the CNN mentioned this letter in the article: “LGBQ teens face serious suicide risk, research finds”.

Image from Pixabay


To know more, these articles are available on CNN and on JAMA websites at these links:  


Remember to visit our page about Flyers!


Looking forward to sharing with you
the next scientific news and reading suggestions!


For further information please contact us to our e-mail address:
epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

Scientific News and Reading Suggestions #12

“Suicide hotspots” is a phrase that can have two meanings: a geographical area with a relatively high rate of suicide among its resident population and a specific, accessible and usually public site often used as a location for suicide, providing either means or opportunity for suicide.
The following articles focus on the key approaches suggested worldwide in order to prevent suicide attempts in hotspots.

  • Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
    Pirkis J, Too LS, Spittal MJ, Krysinska K, Robinson J, Cheung YT.
    Lancet Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;2(11):994-1001. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00266- 7.
    Epub 2015 Sep 22. Review. Erratum in: Lancet Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;2(11):961. PMID: 26409438
  • Cooling suicide hotspots.
    Caine ED.
    Lancet Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;2(11):952-3. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00315- 6. Epub 2015 Sep 22. No abstract available. PMID: 26409437
  • “Hotspots” and “copycats” a plea for more thoughtful language about suicide.
    Owens C.
    Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;3(1):19-20. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00492- 7.
  • “Hotspots” and “copycats” a plea for more thoughtful language about suicide – Authors reply.
    Pirkis J, Krysinska K, Cheung YTD, Too LS, Spittal MJ, Robinson J.
    Lancet Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;3(1):20. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00548- 9.
  • Comparing Different Suicide Prevention Measures at Bridges and Buildings: Lessons We Have Learned from a National Survey in Switzerland.
    Hemmer A, Meier P, Reisch T.
    PLoS One. 2017 Jan 6;12(1):e0169625. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169625. eCollection 2017.
  • Suicides on the Austrian railway network: hotspot analysis and effect of proximity to psychiatric institutions.
    Strauss MJ, Klimek P, Sonneck G, Niederkrotenthaler T.
    R Soc Open Sci. 2017 Mar 8;4(3):160711. doi: 10.1098/rsos.160711. eCollection 2017 Mar. PMID: 28405359
  • Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review.
    Cox GR, Owens C, Robinson J, Nicholas A, Lockley A, Williamson M, Cheung YT, Pirkis J.
    BMC Public Health. 2013 Mar 9;13:214. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458- 13-214. Review.

Looking forward to sharing with you
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epasectionsuicidology@gmail.com

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